Protective Action Criteria
 
Definition of PACs (AEGLs, ERPGs or TEELs)

Acute Exposure Guideline Levels (AEGLs) represent threshold exposure limits for the general public and are applicable to emergency exposures ranging from 10 minutes to 8 hours. Three levels—AEGL-1, AEGL-2, AEGL-3—are developed for each of five exposure periods (10 minutes, 30 minutes, 1 hour, 4 hours, and 8 hours) and are distinguished by varying degrees of severity of toxic effects. DOE guidance is to use the 1 hour AEGL values, which appear in this database. The three AEGLs are defined as follows:

AEGL-1 is the airborne concentration (expressed as ppm [parts per million] or mg/m3 [milligrams per cubic meter]) of a substance above which it is predicted that the general population, including susceptible individuals, could experience notable discomfort, irritation, or certain asymptomatic, nonsensory effects. However, these effects are not disabling and are transient and reversible upon cessation of exposure.

AEGL-2 is the airborne concentration (expressed as ppm or mg/m3) of a substance above which it is predicted that the general population, including susceptible individuals, could experience irreversible or other serious, long-lasting, adverse health effects or an impaired ability to escape.

AEGL-3 is the airborne concentration (expressed as ppm or mg/m3) of a substance above which it is predicted that the general population, including susceptible individuals, could experience life-threatening adverse health effects or death.


Emergency Response Planning Guidelines (ERPGs) are defined as follows:

ERPG-1 is the maximum concentration in air below which it is believed nearly all individuals could be exposed for up to one hour without experiencing other than mild transient adverse health effects or perceiving a clearly defined objectionable odor.

ERPG-2 is the maximum concentration in air below which it is believed nearly all individuals could be exposed for up to one hour without experiencing or developing irreversible or other serious health effects or symptoms that could impair their abilities to take protective action.

ERPG-3 is the maximum concentration in air below which it is believed nearly all individuals could be exposed for up to one hour without experiencing or developing life-threatening health effects.


Temporary Emergency Exposure Limits (TEELs) are defined as follows:

TEEL-1 is the airborne concentration (expressed as ppm [parts per million] or mg/m3 [milligrams per cubic meter]) of a substance above which it is predicted that the general population, including susceptible individuals, when exposed for more than one hour, could experience notable discomfort, irritation, or certain asymptomatic, nonsensory effects. However, these effects are not disabling and are transient and reversible upon cessation of exposure.

TEEL-2 is the airborne concentration (expressed as ppm or mg/m3) of a substance above which it is predicted that the general population, including susceptible individuals, when exposed for more than one hour, could experience irreversible or other serious, long-lasting, adverse health effects or an impaired ability to escape.

TEEL-3 is the airborne concentration (expressed as ppm or mg/m3) of a substance above which it is predicted that the general population, including susceptible individuals, when exposed for more than one hour, could experience life-threatening adverse health effects or death.

TEELs are intended for use until AEGLs or ERPGs are adopted for chemicals.
 
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